All buyers including Purchase-driven love to be appreciated
Photo by Flaunter.com on Unsplash

Marketing Tips for Purchase- Driven Buyers

Purchase-driven buyers know what they’re after, they’re ready to buy.  That doesn’t mean they can’t be influenced to add to their purchase.  If you follow these 4 tips, you’ll help them get what they are after, and very likely more. 

Before we talk about the tips, I have a quick question for you. 

Remember your last grocery shopping experience?

When was the last time you went to the grocery store for a loaf of bread or a quart of milk?  Did you head straight for the appropriate section grab your item and then beeline for the checkout?  Maybe once in a while.

More than likely, you grabbed a cart on your way in the door. Why, if you’re only after 1-2 items?  Patterns.  Our brains like to follow patterns.  It takes less thinking.  So whether you just want milk, or have a full shopping list, you grab that cart.

Last weekend, we just needed milk so I could finish dinner.  My husband kindly offered to run to the little quick market. An hour later, he returned with three full shopping bags and a satisfied smile on his face.

Grocery stores are experiential

We think of grocery stores as places where we make transactional purchases. Not so.  They have made them a maze of experiences.  They start with the moment you enter the store. The greeter gives you a cheery hello and tries to make you feel welcomed.

That cart you grabbed doesn’t speed up shopping, it slows you down.

So do the other shoppers.  What those shoppers have in their hand, or their cart, trigger thoughts of “oh, I need that.”

A free-taste demo stands in the deli staffed by a friendly employee handing out yummy looking tidbits so you can check out their special of the week. 

That little kiosk in the bakery with bits of pastry or cookies to try. No doubt you were slowed down on your way through the bakery area with the addictive aroma of sugar baking.

The weekend-only display of fresh shrimp…appetizers anyone?

My local grocer has added a mini-pub area where shoppers can pause and have a glass of their favorite brew.  And it’s popular.

If you make it past the pub, then there’s wine tasting…if you are of an appropriate age.

Don’t forget all those in-aisle displays that you’ll trip over if you aren’t careful. 

Over the loudspeakers comes the manager’s voice inviting you to come to the red table at the front of the housewares section. For the next two minutes, they will be giving away free gadgets to all adult shoppers. You need to hurry…only one minute remaining.  (Stay in the store long enough and you’ll hear this taped promotional audio repeated multiple times.)

How can you employ what grocery stores do?

Grocery stores may look like innocent transactional, no pressure places to buy food, but they are focused on creating shopping experiences. If you aren’t very disciplined and careful, you’ll, like my husband, go out with three bags of groceries instead of two items. 

We can use some grocery store techniques for our website shoppers.  Here are three.

Look for ways to connect with your visitor.

Think about what you want them to tell about their experience with you. Reverse engineer your customer experience so that it has a positive emotional outcome.  It’s all about how you make them feel.

An emotional connection, a positive feeling about their experience with you is core to creating customer loyalty.

Demonstrate your hospitality by guiding them through their shopping journey.  Help them find things. Chat support can answer questions and engage them in conversation to help them make the best buying decision. 

Make her experience easy and efficient. It’s not always about the price, time, ease of use and efficient ordering simplicity go a long way.

How you make them feel is far more important than if they buy something on the visit. 

If you make them feel good, they may be back. They are also far more apt to tell their friends who might be looking for what you have.

Inspire them to buy from you

Our purchase driven buyer thinks they want just a single item. But we can expose them to the big picture and, like Amazon does, show them what goes with that item.

We never want them to feel pushed.  We want to offer inspiration. Purchasing supporting items saves them time and likely shipping costs. It’s efficient and having the coordinated items can give a positive satisfaction feeling. Also, having all the components enhances the value of each one. 

Think of focusing on your shopping-lovers style of purchasing. The purchase driven buyer won’t be affronted if it’s well done, they will appreciate your thoughtfulness.

They may not have been looking for the “set” but whether they buy or not, they will remember how helpful you were.

Instill confidence

Look for ways to build confidence with your visitor.  You want them to leave feeling they’d like to come back.

Make sure your website is easy to access and navigate. Does it have a friendly comfortable feeling? Is there transparency so she gets a feeling for the company and the people behind it?

Website security is a big supporter of confidence. Ditto with your guarantee.

Customer service can make or break confidence. Women expect great customer service…give it to them.  Make them feel they are getting great value.

With clear and informative product information, support the logical side of their buying decision.

This product is going to help/work for me. Quality brand name with a recognized reliable history.

Look for ways to share your knowledge.

Post those great reviews that show your business is reliable and trustworthy.  They need to feel they can count on you if something goes wrong with the purchase.

Let them know they are appreciated

Never stop saying thank you.  While women are raised to say please and thank you, it is something that is easily overlooked in the business world. 

Do a test drive on your website.  Does it feel like someone there “gets you”?  How do you feel there? Welcome? Ignored? Transactional?

Can you give them a reason to come back?  Maybe a follow-up email with a reminder that they left something in their cart? Maybe a one-time special offer?  Let them know you look forward to working with them again.

Do you have a loyalty program? Create one. It doesn’t have to be a discount or product.  It should be useful and helpful… like a guide or how-to.  Articles or white papers could also be helpful to them.

Thank yous go a long way

Look for little milestones you can celebrate with them. Consider emails or handwritten notes to let them know you remembered their birthday, anniversary or other special events.

Think about a reward program you are signed up with.  What do you like the most about it? The least?  Use existing reward programs to springboard your creativity to come up with your own.

When I work with clients we focus on building client relationships by focusing on these four concepts. Build emotional connections, offer inspiration, building confidence and always reminding them they are valued and appreciated.