Ginsu knives specialized in over-deliver. They coined the phrase, "But wait, there's more."

There is one sure-fire way to a successful business…giving customers something they want and more, in essence, over-deliver. 

“But wait, there’s more”

Back in the late 1970s-early 80s, Ginsu knives made a fortune on their perfectly crafted television infomercials.  It uses the get a lot for a little formula.  

They demonstrate their knife-wielding skills showcasing how fabulous their knives are. As the demonstration draws to a close, they open their offer with  “Now how much would you pay? Don’t answer!”  

Then they reduced the price or sweetened the deal with add on bonuses. More and more and more.

They urged viewers to “Call now! Operators are standing by!”  Even then they added more bonuses to the offer.

They created the tagline which is still used today, “But wait! There’s more!”

The value was so high compared to the price, people couldn’t resist.

It was so successful, they used the exact same formula, and spokespeople, to market a number of other equally successful household items.  

Exceeding expectations works

In my practice, I’ve always tried to exceed people’s expectations, but I never thought of it as over-delivering. I just wanted customers that were so happy they’d return and refer me to their friends.

Over-delivering is a term I learned from a master copywriter, Brian Kurtz.  He is one of the most successful marketers out there and has over 40 years of experience behind him. Over-delivering is his specialty.

I’ve found Brian’s insights accurate and useful in my work with clients and in marketing. If you want to dive deeper, his book Overdeliver is available on Amazon.  

One thing most people don’t realize

A customer’s lifetime value is directly related to the depth of the relationship. Lists and contacts are inanimate. They are for transactions. Human interaction is based on relationships. Every way your buyers encounter you, websites, social media, emails, chatbots need to be relationship-focused. Giving more than expected is a key way to build those relationships. 

In today’s world, where more buying happens online than in a store, this is even more critical. It’s also what people are looking for. They want to understand you, your business, and what you stand for.

The more transparent you are the better they feel about you.  If they can’t even find out where a company is located, or get in touch with them, it rather feels like something is being hidden. 

3 ways to over-deliver

There are three types of people out there, givers, takers, and matchers. Takers have their hands out ready to receive. Takers love it when people offer to help them, but seldom give anything in return. Matchers are tit for tat people. If given something, they respond by giving back the exact same value. 

Givers share with no strings attached.  No expectations. They give to help others.

Be the giver. They share information, appreciate the person they interact with, treat them with respect, reward them. Givers are relationship builders. 

Businesses that follow this pattern have the greatest success.

Every interaction a relationship event

Look for ways to make every interaction a relationship event.  Give information, help, and support freely. Let customers and prospects know you appreciate them. 

Make emails personalized not automated generic. Nurture them, answer questions…even ones they haven’t thought of yet. Thank them, reward them.

Talk to them as person to person.  Be conversational, invite a response. Social media is especially good to get conversations going. Monitor what triggers get responses and use them again.

Give them what they want

Many businesses have an idea and create a product. Then they reach out to find people who they think need it.  Too often, it misses the mark. What the customer wants doesn’t match with the solutions they are offered.

When a product is still in the concept stage that’s the ideal time to make sure it is a clear match. Ask them, research it, follow forums. How can you tweak it to have a 100% match?

It might be the right product but the wrong packaging, formulation, or value.  

Maybe they need more information to understand your product/service or how to use it.  Free guides or how-tos can be invaluable.

Convert transactions to relationships with over-delivery

Often fulfillment and customer support are treated as transactions. Instead, treat them as part of your marketing.  

I once received an order and inside the product was nicely tissue wrapped with a small envelope on top.  Inside was a brief inspirational message and a piece of a cinnamon stick. It was totally unexpected. A gift, a bonus, and I can still tell you exactly who that item came from.

If you’re doing a subscription offer, thank them for renewing.  If you shipped them a product, ask if they have any questions on how to use it. Targeted nurturing emails, segmented by product or interest, following a purchase are an excellent technique to bond.

Be reachable and responsive.  I’ve noticed that almost every business  I interact with has a message to expect delays. It’s true of phone messages, web notices, and email responses. 

Sometimes you get the message and then an immediate contact. Other times, you may wait for days, even weeks. 

After all this time, we need to figure out a way to be more responsive. Put yourself in the buyer’s shoes. How long would You realistically want to wait? Figure out a way to make that happen.

How I approach this

When I work with a new client, I look at the touchpoints from the viewpoint of their buyer. How does it “feel”.  It may work fine, but feel impersonal. I look for transactionality and ways to replace it with over-delivery and relationship building. 

Here’s a quick read on Keep Your Customers Delighted.

Importance of Relationships for 2021

Blake Morgan recently wrote on Customer Service in the Smartphone era.

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