Let’s Humanize Marketing

To humanize marketing is to connect person to person instead of business to business.  We buy from the people inside the business, not the business itself.
Connecting with other humans is key to successful marketing.

We get all caught up in categories. We get hung up on names like B2B and B2C. Instead, we need to focus on how to humanize marketing messages by speaking directly to our prospects. We need to write H2H.

Humanizing marketing is making it personal so readers connect with us more easily. When our prospects connect with our message, they identify with our brand and what we stand for.  That leads to increased sales and higher Customer Lifetime Value.

“I need help!”

I see posts in chat groups and get emails like this regularly.  Usually, the comment goes something like the one my friend Teri sent me.

I’ve got a new prospect in my niche, but they are B2B.  I’ve looked in all the training I’ve taken, but nothing really focuses on B2B.”

“So what can you tell me about the prospect?  How big is the company?”  

He’s a very committed eager business owner. So I want to be sure an offer him the best B2B approach.”

Ah-ha!  This scenario is a common issue where I see many people get confused.   

B2B defines as businesses that sell to other companies. Her prospect matches that.

However, most B2B courses are focused on manufacturing. They are often larger companies where a whole buying process exists, more like dealing with a committee than a person. Each stakeholder comes with different needs and views.

This buying process isn’t the scenario Teri is facing.  She’s not dealing with a committee. Teri’s dealing with a single person. It’s much easier to deal with one decision-maker. She needs to focus on her prospect’s target market and help him craft messages to reach them effectively. The tone of the message content will be the only shift from standard B2C writing.

In my writing and coaching, I’ve seen this a lot.

For over twenty years, I’ve dealt with a branch of my business that sells B2B. But like Teri’s prospect, we aren’t classical B2B manufacturers.  Instead, we deal with licensed professionals who buy our products to use in offering services to consumers. So technically, it’s B2B, but it is closer to B2C in the decision-making process, just like my friend’s situation.  

The writing tone to small business owners is less formal than classic B2B. Our audience mindset is a combination. They think both like a consumer and a business owner. It’s essential to their success as they have so much on the line. Instead, they want H2H communications.

What I shared with Teri is to quit worrying about the labels. Instead, focus on humanizing—writing human to human.  

Business success is dependent on engagement. Without engagement, we can’t connect with another human being—our message gets lost. Companies don’t sell to companies.  It’s the humans inside those companies connecting with other humans.  Marketers and writers need to focus on those humans.

Keep this secret in mind.

In the fast-paced world of marketing, there are lots of parameters to consider. First, it’s critical to get the right offer and message. Then you need to deliver it to the right person. We become obsessed with subject lines, graphics, and coming up with the latest and greatest.

I’d like to suggest hitting pause. Think about the individual you are trying to engage. What are their goals, needs and how can you help them.  Then talk to them—one human to another.  Humanize it.

An honest, person-to-person approach is the best marketing.

3 techniques to humanize

Humanizing your marketing is all about having a conversation with another person. There is NO generic feeling.  There should be NO sense the same message is going to a group or list.  

Instead, the focus is more like sharing information with a friend over coffee or a glass of wine. The tone reflects your audience, ranging from more casual to professional. I liken it to attending a conference and visiting with a colleague at the end of the day.  You are engaging one professional to another but in a very conversational way.

Humanize—Speak specifically to a person

Segment your audience, dividing groups to speak to them in a more specific way. Grouping allows you to hone into their interests, concerns, and needs. Segmenting makes your message more targeted, engaging and improves ROI.  

Sometimes segmenting may seem a little elusive. That’s because most B2B businesses attract diversity in prospects, even if they employ targeted marketing.  Segment them based on the company’s size, differences in what they offer/need, or the different pathways they found you.  These pathways may impact their level of awareness about your business.  

Segmenting by the level of awareness is a primary technique to share the message in the proper order and intensity. First, categorize your segments for your particular audience. Then, use the targeted approach to enhance message engagement and ROI.

Talk conversationally

Post your photo. When readers see a person’s picture, it’s easier for them to connect. You want your business to be the people that make up the business.  If you have a team, you can showcase your team, their goals, successes, and even outside activities. 

You want communications that come across as authentic, honest, and genuine. Share your story, how and why you built this business.  Maybe you were your ideal client. Now you’ve overcome a health, weight, or fitness challenge. Those stories let your prospects see hope and a chance for themselves. 

In today’s world, prospective clients also want to know what a business stands for. So share your values and opinions. For example, let them know how you give back, support the community, and help protect the planet.  

Be a giver

I learned this from one of the most engaging marketers I’ve ever listened to, Brian Kurtz. Author of “Overdeliver” and founder of Titans Marketing, he excels at giving prospects and clients more than they expect.  

Like all the presenters at this conference, he finished with an offer.  Buy the “offer,” and he included a collection of  “extra bonuses” that were mind-boggling. His sales rate was astronomical. Why? It was too good a deal to pass up.

Have I gone through all of the bonus segments? No, but I got great value from an excellent investment. (You want your prospect to respond the same way.)

If you want to connect with your target audience, be like Brian. Be a giver. Give them so much extra value that any other choice looks crazy.  You may not be the cheapest out there, but if what you offer is five-ten times the price in value, you will get their attention. You have become a unique and no-brainer decision.

The bonus value doesn’t mean the offer requires a slashed sale price.

There are many ways to offer a bonus or extra value. For example, consider a free report, checklists, guides, infographics, podcasts, or a recording from a live event. Amaze them with the extra value you include and a moderate-priced offer. In addition to a sale, you get their contact information. This pure gold allows you to add them to your list/funnels.

Focus on what will appeal to your prospective client. Then when you write for those clients, do the same thing for their target audience. Help them be a giver so they can reap the rewards that extend far beyond an initial sale.  


Judith Culp Pearson is a freelance copywriter marketer. She specializes in helping businesses build relationships that result in loyal customers with high customer lifetime value. Contact: judith@jculpcreativecopy.com or schedule a call here:

B2B Buyers Want B2C Shopping in 2021!

B2B buyers now want shopping to reflect that of their B2C experience. The lines are blurring.
B2B shoppers want B2C experiences

The face of marketing to B2B buyers is rapidly changing, and there is a lot of somewhat confusing information out there.  After sifting through mountains of information, I found three keys B2B buyers desire when looking for a solution.

In one sentence—B2B buyers want their experience to mirror their B2C personal shopping experiences.

My own experience as a B2B buyer

One of the hats I’ve worn was as the buyer for the B2B division of my company. As a distributor, we purchased from the manufacturer and sold to professionals who used the product in their retail businesses.

The twist is that I also handled customer service. So I felt keenly aware of our customer’s pain points and needs. I wasn’t randomly shopping for new items to add to our professional collection.  I was only open to things that could seamlessly integrate into our B2B buyer’s needs.  

Regularly, I got pitches from all sorts of companies who thought they had the hottest item on the market.  Many were duplicates of what we already carried.  Others were selling items unrelated to our niche. A third group sold devices only legal for medical professionals to purchase—less than 5% of our buyers.

Many were non-US-based firms wanting us to import their items. They’d gotten our contact information from who knew where and were mass marketing.  It was immediately clear from the pitch email the sender knew nothing about our business.  

  • I didn’t know the email sender. 
  • Their spam approach screamed at me. 
  • There had been no attempts to build trust. 

It felt like a guy trying to get you to jump into bed at the first meeting. Ick. Turn and sprint away.

The companies I built relationships with were for the long term.  We wanted products that our buyers could trust would be there and always meet specific performance standards.  They were companies we learned we could depend on.  

Trust was a huge factor.  Support and accessibility to information, quick customer support, and a willingness to work with us to resolve any challenges. 

We’ve done business with one of these firms for well over 20 years. It’s not something the buyer thinks of, but I can’t even guesstimate the CLV of our monthly purchases over that time frame. 

B2B Buyers and Marketers have a lot in common.

With years as both a marketer and a B2B buyer, I’ve noticed the two have a lot in common. Both are putting their business, reputations, and jobs on the line with every purchase they make.

Both buyers and marketers are deluged with proposals and pitches. They both have to sort through masses of emails to identify any nugget that might be of real benefit to their business situation.

Recognizing those experiences and the similarities have helped me help my marketing clients. We build the relationship as team partners to discover solutions and create a strong ROI. Perfectly done with a successful marketing campaign or project, it’s a win-win for both.  

Here’s a secret to keep in mind…

Stakeholders view things differently—it’s vital to recognize that each person with a stake in the decision views the process a little differently. They come at it from different departments, different needs, and even different goals. As a result, their risk factors may be higher, and decisions more complex. 

They may need different types of answers. Communications need to help each person feel comfortable with the decision. 

We need to keep in mind, each stakeholder probably feels their reputation and job is on the line. It’s not about our marketing. It’s about their comfort zone. So focus on answering their needs with relevant information, including the know, like, and trust factors. Easily accessible information and answers are the best paths to help them decide to buy.

3 key ways to help your B2B buyer

When we focus on the B2B buyer’s needs, it is all about quickly and efficiently helping them find what they need.  Depending on the type of B2B that you work with, this can be very complex. 

The higher the ticket price, the more information, details, and data are needed to support the decision—and the more people will be involved. It’s a longer, more complex process with higher stakes.

Content – useable, findable, relevant

Buyers need detailed information designed for quick, easy consumption.  They may or may not be the technician or engineer working with a complex piece of equipment.  However, they may be responsible for identifying possible solutions and then sharing them for input before making a decision.  

Keep in mind B2B buyers want content as quickly readable as when they do their B2C shopping. So make layout and content designed for easy reading and rapid assimilation.  Include whitespace, supporting graphics, and bulleted lists.

Offer cross-links and “also relevant” links to help them find additional information.

Be sensitive to what’s happening in the real world.  We’ve been through a lot of turmoil in the last 18 months. Now things with a twang of nostalgia offer comfort and a sense of security.  However, include nostalgia only if it fits and makes sense.  

Be interactive

B2B buyers are looking for instant information. They don’t want to send an email and wait a week for an answer.  The best interaction helps them quickly find what they need, now.

AI, chatbots, and the like can fill in an interactive gap.  Of course, the better they interact and offer more specific answers, the more valuable they become.

Include all the frequently asked questions your customer service team hears.  The more you include, the happier the buyer will be.  

Analyze surveys or questions that have come up on social media. These offer tidbits of information the buyer needs. 

Make the interaction smooth. Create a feeling of ease that includes transfers across support services. In addition, increased seamlessness increases the buyer satisfaction rate.

Retention saves B2B relationships and dollars.

Having a great experience and a trusting relationship make the buyer’s next purchasing decision more straightforward. If there is plenty of retention-focused TLC, you become their trusted resource.

Trust is imperative to keep the buyer coming back. Help them feel valued, respected and that you are there as a team partner to solve problems. 

The results?  A higher customer lifetime value and wins for both buyers and marketers.


Judith Culp Pearson is a result-oriented relationship-building and empathy-based marketer specializing in B2B wellness and information. Reach her at judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

Marketing for Beauty and Wellness?

Beauty is more tied into cultural standards for ideal mates while wellness is about healthy lifestyle choices including exercise, nutrition and spirituality.
Beauty and Wellness Attributes

Beauty and Wellness comprise over a 4.2 trillion dollar market and growing exponentially.  But the terms can be a bit confusing or vague. So, as a marketer, how do you pick the best words to reach your market? A recent study by the University of Pennsylvania showed that while there are some commonly associated definitions, there is also a broad diversity. 

That study focused on semantics and looked at term associations based on age groups and gender. My concerns were as a marketer. How do we choose the correct terms to reach our target market? Do people understand what wellness encompasses?  What about beauty?  How do people actually think about it, define, it and engage with it? 

What do those in Wellness say?

This spring, I interviewed over a dozen different people in the wellness industry.  Marketers, beauty and supplement manufacturers, coaches, fitness experts, nutritionists, and more. As much diversity of the sector as I could connect with.  

My core question was how we could make wellness more understandable in our messages. Do people really “get” how diverse it is? The responses were all over the place.  Some had found phrases or words that connected with their specific segment of the public. 

Others were all about expanding the dialogue about how to better share wellness concepts. They agreed there is an opportunity for a lot of improvement.

Effectively marketing beauty and wellness depends on the audience.

As with all marketing success, communication is the key. First, you have to hone in on your target audience.  The more you know about your ideal client, the easier it is to select the best terms to connect, engage and move them forward. This identification is essential considering the diversity found in this study.

In this study, they found that some terms are cross-generational.  Others terms are age-related. The more life experience, the more it colors the way we think.  And yes, it makes a difference whether you are selling to men or women.

When working with clients, experienced marketers focus on these differences. The more we understand how our target group thinks about beauty and wellness, the more we engage them.

Here’s a secret they discovered

We can’t discount the survival genetics built into our primal brain.  Ancient ancestors’ survival depended on selecting a suitable mate.  Attributes of attraction were those that indicated the ability to survive and procreate. Those would have been considered beauty.

For both sexes, this meant appealing, attractive features, good teeth, and a strong constitution. 

The most desirable men had a body built for successful hunting and protection. The most beautiful women had a body configured for pregnancy and to nurture children. Attributes related to healthy and fertile mates.

Those with less desirable features or lacking other attributes slipped down the selection pyramid from the top choice. These preferences are still clearly evident among animal groups today. A puny, weak animal isn’t going to have the opportunity to procreate. It was about the survival of the species.

Look at any magazine or marketing advertisement today, and you can still see these biases in action among humans. It’s only been very recently we are embracing and recognizing the value in those who are unique or different.

Three considerations for key term selection

The study findings divide into three categories. First, there were terms common to all age groups and both men and women respondents.  Second, generational dependent words. And third choices that were different between genders.

Generally accepted terms for beauty and wellness.

The survival considerations that guided our ancient ancestors evolved over the millennia. Greek and Roman influence involved more intellectual pursuits and lifestyle, as well as that of seeking pleasure. 

Beauty today is most often associated with lovely, feminine, gorgeous, elegant, stylish, and sexy. Elegance and grace are different from sexiness, but there is a clear overlap in the association with beauty.

Key wellness alternatives include fitness, aerobics, health, lifestyle, nutrition, thrive, holistic, and meditation. 

They also verified what the marketers I interviewed noticed. 

  1. Generally, there is more clarity and uniformity on the term beauty. 
  2. At the same time, there is more diversity in the meaning of wellness.  

The term beauty is more related to physical and cultural attributes. On the other hand, wellness relates more to active practices that promote health and thriving.

Generational differences on beauty and wellness.

The study included people from Gen-Z, Millennials, Gen-X, and Baby Boomers. It acknowledged there are individual differences within each group despite the commonalities. 

Life experiences influenced the term associations.  The study proposes that with the accumulation of life experience, we increase the tendency to segregate semantically. As a result, the terms become more specific. 

Our increased lifespan, and therefore increased level of experience may also contribute to differences.

Another attribution for the difference is age heightens socio-cultural awareness and related stereotypes.  Most often, these are related to the words attributed to young, beautiful, healthy bodies.

In the past, men identified with looking rugged, macho, and exhibiting athletic superiority. However, younger men today are increasingly concerned with personal image and appearance. These shifts may result from the changing employment culture’s impact on social values.

Variations by gender

It’s interesting to note that semantics, the meaning of the words used, were more structured among women than men.  

When considering the terms beauty and wellness, women segregated them more. For example, education had been classified initially as a wellness term. But among both women and boomers, it was attributed to beauty.

Another example is that delicious, exotic, and talent were initially classified as beauty terms.  But in some groups, they are more associated with wellness. So again, it’s about researching and knowing your specific group.

When I work with clients

I help them match their message, the terms used, and the SEO to their targeted audience. It’s complex and requires segmenting the audience, tracking, and testing to assure the best outcome. https://www.jculpcreativecopy.com.
For the complete details and the full article, you can read it here.

Tell Your Story—They Want to Know You

Your story helps buyers get to know you. That's the first step in know, like and trust so they feel confident to buy.

Telling your story is the first essential step to sales. People need to know you so they can like you and start to trust you. So to help them get to know you—tell your story. Who you are, what you stand for, and what makes you unique.

Avoid being like these guys.

Internet and phone providers have about the worst reputation for engagement and finding ways to bond with customers.

I recently had to deal with helping an aging parent transition to assisted living. Ugh, in anyone’s book. But mom didn’t want this even though she needed it. So I had to help her make it happen.  

She just needed internet and a telephone line. But, unfortunately, as an existing customer of the company that provided service in her facility, it got way more complicated.  

Their automated system kept trying to tie me and my account into what I created for Mom.  

While they spend fortunes on marketing, it’s all about the product. People put up with the system because it is an essential service in today’s world. 

There is NO way to reach support on their website or phone tree. Not even a contact number anywhere on their website. You have to Google to find one. Everything wants doing online.

AI wraps you into a maze without resolution.

I spent a frustrating two weeks trying to get internet and phone established. When I did finally reach someone, they told me the new account had been incorrectly set up. 

It’s no wonder so many people are disconnecting from cable and looking for alternative providers. But, unfortunately, the system is very broken and unfriendly. No news to you, I’m sure.

No differentiation in your story? – no USP

As a freelance marketer, I’ve seen businesses spend vast amounts of money trying to sell their products. 

One sale after another becomes a pricing competition when that isn’t the deciding criteria for many people. 

Today’s marketplace is crowded. As a result, products or services can tend to look alike. So they up the advertising budget without considering why prospects aren’t buying.  

In the customer’s eyes, they may see no difference between brands X, Y, and Z.  No differentiating uniqueness from one business to another. That’s why your unique story is so important to share. 

It’s an asset that businesses often overlook.

Keep your target customer in mind.

When building your brand and your product, it’s essential to keep your target audience in mind. Each generation has differences. However, today’s buyers all care about similar things—value, culture, and customer care. Our cable company failed in all three.

3 Things your story must share and prove

All customers are looking for products and services with value. Products that aren’t high enough quality to warrant repeat sales will undermine business success. 

Buyers want to know what you stand for and how you give back.  And they want to know how you take care of them as your customer.

Value

Many businesses focus on price as value. However, price is only a small part of value.  Today’s shopper is more concerned about the value they receive for the price paid instead of just the price itself.

Therefore, in your story, you need to share all the components of “value” included in your offer.  

The more value enhancements you offer, the higher the price the buyer is willing to pay.  

Bonuses, reports, guides, support, quick delivery, rewards, and your culture are all part of your value.  They are also what makes you unique in an ocean of similar choices.  

It’s essential to include these in your brand story.  To keep the message simple, straightforward, and targeted, you may find that you need to break it up. Tell your story in easily memorable segments.

Culture

Millennials lead the movement in choosing businesses they deal with to have a positive planet-friendly and people-friendly approach.  They don’t want to do business with those who cause harm to others so that they can buy.  

In your story, share how you give back to the planet and the community.  Company size doesn’t matter, that you are concerned about others does.  Share this culture with your audience. 

A friendly giving culture that isn’t just words but really happens can be the tipping point in deciding where to purchase.

Customer Care

Customer service is a huge issue. It’s one many companies have struggled with during the pandemic. Some companies already had excellent customer service and continued it. 

Others are still struggling to make it happen. It comes across almost like they are using the pandemic as an excuse for whatever they don’t want to address.

If the only message they receive is “sale,” that’s not customer support.

Look for every opportunity to stay connected with buyers. Create social media chats.  Generate email thank you sequences, updates, e-newsletters, nurturing, and rewards. 

When I work with clients

I look for all the things that set them apart and make them unique. We craft and share these stories to help buyers get to know, like, and trust them.  We cultivate those buyers into long-term relationships with a high customer lifetime value.  judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

Your Exclusive Rewards Build Customer Loyalty and Dollars Spent

Last week I talked about the importance of enhancing your business rewards program.  I wasn’t the only person talking about the need for this. Customer Experience Futurist Blake Morgan was also sharing.  

This year it is more important than ever before to offer rewards tailored to your targeted audience. If your audience includes Gen Z, the positive stats for loyalty rewards jump even higher.

Review of Ms. Morgan’s article

50 Stats that Show the Importance of Good Loyalty Rewards

If you don’t yet have a loyalty program, it’s time to join the more than 90% of companies that do.

52% of American consumers will join the loyalty program of brands they regularly purchase. A surprising 84% have made a redemption from a rewards program.

Not all loyalty programs get used. Most, 65% of consumers engage with less than half of their loyalty programs. 

Satisfaction with loyalty programs has dropped to 44%, down from 47% in 2018.  People are looking for businesses that offer something better.

Interestingly a whopping 95% of consumers, according to Code Broker, want to engage with more loyalty programs using chatbots, AI, or VR and their smart devices.  75% want them accessible on their smartphone.

Engage with your customers emotionally, and they spend 27% more.  Personalization is huge. When you do it well for your members, it creates a 6.4x lift in their satisfaction with your program.

Loyalty rewards increase sales

One stat I didn’t mention, Incentive Solutions, shared that adding a loyalty program to your e-commerce platform can increase average order quantity by 319%.  

With the competition becoming more fierce as companies try to capture some of the “rebound spending,” it’s vital to ramp up bonding. The better your rewards, the stronger your fan loyalty will be. 

Make sure those rewards are easy to earn and relevant to your audience.

Psychographics can maximize your rewards program.

Psychographics focuses on what and why people respond as they do. And the buying triggers are different for women and men. Since women influence so much of the spending, cater to their reward psychographics to maximize your efforts.

The use of psychographics can be of benefit when considering personalization and relevance. But it’s also beneficial for the emotional triggers of social consciousness. 

Here are my 3 key takeaways on the benefits of loyalty rewards.

There are certainly lots of things to consider to create a winning rewards program.`

Keep reward programs simple

The last thing your customers want is a complicated reward system. In the article, stats showed that you’d reduce the number of users if you require a downloaded app. 

The days of wallets stuffed with rewards cards are over.  Most people don’t want to carry them, and yours is apt to be left on the counter or tossed. 

Avoid or give very generous expiration dates. Rewards expiring before use is a frustration for members. Be sure to thank them for a redemption—you’ll be in the minority that does.

Most consumers, 95%, want to access their rewards via their smartphones. They like to use AI, Chatbots, and VI.  

Giving gifts increases bonding.

Finding ways to say thank you, even when they make a redemption, holds value for consumers.  And if you employ those thank yous, you’ll be in the minority of businesses who take that extra step.

I’ve never met anyone who didn’t enjoy a surprise gift or an unexpected piece of mail that wasn’t trying to sell something…just say thank you. 

If you don’t have physical products, there are other options. There are numerous programs available that offer gifts that can be personalized. It becomes a branding opportunity to keep customers thinking of you.  Branded items offer a bit of swag, another bonus members love.

Even early access to sales is a gift they like.  46% of customers love this bonus.

Or, send members an incentive.75% of consumers purchased something after receiving a reward.

Willing to pay for upgraded loyalty reward program

Don’t discount an upgrade option. Creating an optional paid upgrade can bond members even more. They paid something, which increases the desire to use the benefits. 

Paid membership puts you into an elite inner circle. After a year of being disconnected, being a part of something has enhanced value.  

When I work with clients

For new clients, or when we’re doing a review, I put on my “consumer hat.”  I put myself in the shoes of their target audience and look for ways to enhance their customer experience and loyalty programs. 

A customer who likes your brand and is pleased with your rewards program is far more apt to recommend you to their friends.

Need help?  Judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

You can read Blake Morgan’s Article HERE.

Do You Use Glicken to Grow Customer Lifetime Value?

An unexpected win, bonus or surprise, a bit of good luck, all are forms of glicken.

Glicken is a term often associated with receiving a bit of unexpected good luck or a lucky bonus. I once heard it called getting the piece of cake with the extra treat on top. Winning the lottery would be glicken. So would a surprise with your purchase.

People love getting extra bonuses—surprises, add ons, a treat. For a business, giving glicken bonds customers and builds lifetime loyalty.

My husband loves deals.

My husband is from Yorkshire in northern England. Like in Scotland, money is dearly held in Yorkshire.  So if he can get a good deal on something he’s already decided on, it’s pure glicken.  

Yesterday we attended a vintage motorcycle show and sale.  He went to sell some parts and see what was out there. 

After two years of doing without, motorcycle enthusiasts showed up in droves. They wanted to show off their bikes, shop for missing “project” parts, and visit. (A project is a current bike you’re working on.)

When things slowed down, he went for a walk to explore for deals while I stayed at the canopy with his motorcycle “bits.” 

A while later, he returned with a smile on his face and a gleam in his eyes. I knew he scored a find. Someone was selling off all his bikes. The man had a terrific deal on some parts my husband could use or resell. 

This morning I overheard hubby on the phone with the fellow. The guy had sold a motorcycle and dropped the price on what my husband wanted by $400, delivery included!!

For a Yorkshire man—that’s pure glicken.

Glicken can work magic for your business too.

I used these unexpected bonuses with customers for years. They love being surprised, thanked, and rewarded.  

When you bond a buyer and become their preferred go-to resource, the relationship can last for years or even decades. I’ve had it happen a lot. It’s how you’re successful in the spa/beauty industry. Repeat loyal customers. 

They know you, like you, and trust that you have their best interests at heart. 

They refer or bring family and friends because of the trust relationship.

No money can buy that marketing.  It takes time and consistency to build this relationship, but the lifetime customer value makes it worth the effort.

Here’s a secret 

This loyalty relationship focuses on value as opposed to ongoing discounts. Shared interests, concerns, social values, reliability, quality, performance, and the culture of your business all are part of the value.

Today’s buyer wants far more than a product or a service.  They want relationships if you’re going to keep them coming back.

3 techniques to create and share glicken.

A huge percentage of transactions today are online. So you need to capitalize on quick and easy—but often overlooked ways to build the relationship online. 

Since online has become more crowded, you can make a massive impact by going offline.  

Then top off your efforts with surprise rewards. 

Maximize online techniques

Business e-commerce platforms come with built-in systems for communicating with visitors and buyers. Out-of-the-box they are very dull and transactional. They need to be customized to match your brand and your customers. They need to sound like conversations, not stilted text.

Personalize them using shortcodes, so the emails come to them, a person. 

Test each one! I can’t tell you how frequently I get an email that includes my name in the header but opens with: Hi [Fname].  

You need to know what your shoppers are receiving. Think of it this way—accuracy builds more value.

Statistics show it is worth the investment to have automation set up to follow your shopper through the buying journey and afterward. Coach them past the abandoned cart. Don’t neglect them after the sale.  It’s prime time to up-sell, cross-sell, and show them how to maximize the product’s benefits.

Free reports, how-tos, and guides are all glicken to the buyer.  

Connect offline for more glicken

In a world of emails, receiving something via mail is a novelty. When was the last time you got a birthday card or thank you note in the mail? It makes the sender stand out like a unicorn in a herd of donkeys. 

Your value doesn’t always have to be free. A print newsletter or monthly report could be glicken.  People have a higher perceived value for something in print over digital. You might consider a subscription for a monthly print offering. If you have a target market of 55+, this demographic is the most likely to prefer print over digital.

Glicken rewards

In this value-based relationship model, rewards can be anything.  It could be expedited handling and shipping for those over a specific threshold. 

You might give your circle of buyers advance notice of a pre-holiday sale event, especially if there are limited quantities. Or let them be the first to hear about a new product launch. As previous customers, they may be ready to buy something relevant—and give you valuable feedback on it. 

I had a company that tucked a small, tan, lumpy envelope in every order. It held a stick of cinnamon and a positive quote, plus a hand-written thank you. I loved those little notes.

If you have product samples, those are also great to tuck into the package—and trigger more sales. 

How-to-use graphics tucked into the order can also cross-sell and enhance the buyer’s experience.

Even the order itself can be glicken if they see you are making an effort to deliver the item using environmentally friendly packaging.

Online communications. Offline communications. And in-the-box communications can all build glicken and your lifetime customer value.

Need help finding glicken? I can help you discover glicken your customers will love. Message me: judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.