How Empathy Builds Buyer Trust and Your Marketing Wins

Empathy engagement is key to relationship building. It’s the marketing path to creating long-term loyal fans and relationships.  

But you won’t find what you need in a ream of demographics. Numbers and statistics don’t tell you what their thinking, feeling, or how they are responding to you. 

Empathy engagement 

Before I moved into full-time copywriting marketing, I worked in the beauty industry. I helped thousands of women feel better, more confident, and happier because I solved problems for them. 

I offered cosmetic and medical skin pigmentation, tattooing. Women with missing brow hair or busy lives loved eyebrows and eyeliner—makeup that stayed put. 

However, the clients I engaged the deepest with were recovering from breast cancer.

I knew exactly how it felt to go through the trauma of diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and reconstruction. I had been there myself. There is no going back; there is only moving forward.

They’d tell me their story. Each was unique. Then they often wanted to know mine. We engaged.

And then we started their journey to healing.  The addition of 3-D color to a bare mound profoundly impacts how you see yourself in the mirror. The result offered liberation from the physical and psychological angst they had gone through.

It is tough to truly understand what’s going on inside your client’s head if you haven’t “walked in their shoes.”

Empathy marketing will increase your success.

Physically having had your prospects’ problem is powerful. Fortunately, there are ways around it. And even in a group of people who share a common problem, they don’t react the same way.  

I had to learn to quickly spot how each client was coping and adapt my strategies to help them.  It’s the same with our marketing.  We have to take into account the different segments within our prospects. 

Messages have to shift based on where the prospect is in their journey.  You need to determine their level of awareness.

Those messages also have to be adapted based on their beliefs, biases, and personal experiences. But it all starts with research. 

I didn’t develop this, but I did learn from an expert. The absolute master of empathy marketing was Eugene Schwartz, and he shares his secrets in a book called “Breakthrough Advertising.” (It’s available through Titans Marketing, LLC.)

It’s not a quick read. The book is intense and requires rereading and study, but the secrets are there to unfold.

One secret—you can’t fake it.

There are many marketers who “think” they know the client and charge off to create their marketing. The resulting response and sales will be lower than if research were completed.

It’s like trying to put a puzzle together with some of the pieces missing. Your prospect sees the holes. 

Holes in your marketing puzzle weaken or break trust. And this loss of trust is apt to cause disengagement, loss of the sale, and loss of lifetime customer value.

Three steps to discover and employ empathy engagement

Research is where it starts. You have to dive into both your prospective buyer’s mind and into what you are offering—product or service. 

With completed research you have the tools to employ emotion, empathy, and your message.

Research your prospect 

All  human desires can be placed into one of three categories. They fall into better health, increased wealth, and relationships. But we can’t stop with this superficial analysis. 

What part of health do they want to improve? Why? What have they tried before? What were the results?  The list of whats, whys, and hows can be extensive. It’s easy to stop too soon.

Keep in mind they are people and unique, but it is possible to find common denominators.

You want to discover what they will tell you about their need. Then seek out the underlying what they won’t tell you. Go deeper to get to the emotional what they can’t tell you. Now you understand their core motivator—something they have so locked away in their brain it may be a secret even to them.

Next analyze your product or service.

You’ll also do an analysis of the features and benefits of what you are selling. The features describe the physical product. You’ll want to create a detailed list.

Then dive into the benefits. Benefits are how it helps the buyer. “What it does.” That’s what people buy. They want the results.

You’ll want to know the USP—what makes this a unique solution, why and how. You’ll need to know its competition and gather proof and credibility.  

What do your customers say about your product?  LIkes, dislikes, questions, suggestions are all valuable.

Empathy engagement employs emotion and feelings.

Now that you know both your prospect and your product, you can start matching. You build connections or bridges between their needs and your solution.

Match the prospect’s desires and the product benefits/performances.  Paint them pictures of how it’s going to make their life better. Whether in copy or content format, you help them discover why your product is the solution.

We all have the same emotions. Use words and images to make them smile, laugh, cry, feel joy or pain. Those emotions create experiences to inspire, connect and motivate them with our messages.

Look for ways to employ emotions and feelings to help them experience the benefits and results of the product. Through persuasive techniques, you move them along their journey until they have to buy. Then nurture and support them.


Ready to attract new buyers, increase lifetime buyer value, build sales, and more engagement? You need empathy-engaging content and copywriting. Let’s have a quick chat. You can message me: Judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

“Edutainment” Powers Up Engagement

Use edutainment for customer engagement.

“Edutainment” content is a secret weapon to get viewer’s attention and engage them. 

Our prospects spend a fair amount of time scrolling through social media or searching online. Subliminally, they are looking for answers to nagging problems.

“Edutainment” content is a secret weapon to get viewer’s attention and engage them.

IF we can catch their attention and keep it, we have the opportunity to help them.

So what’s edutainment?

The first time I heard of edutainment was about 15 years ago when I attended an instructor continuing education workshop. The educator was smartly dressed and pulled together from head to toes. She was in the beauty industry, after all.

“You can’t teach someone if you don’t get their attention.”

I remember jolting more upright in my seat. I knew it was true but had never thought of it that way.

The presenter slapped a silly fishing hat festooned with lures on her head. People giggled. She smiled.

“See, I’ve got your attention. If we can hook the student with a prop or change of approach, we can share.

“Teachers need to be more than educators. They need to employ edutainment.”

It changed the way I taught, and the students loved it.

If you tune into any “kids” channel, you’re likely to see edutainment in action. Catchy tunes, graphics, and tidbits of education cloaked in fun.

Southwest Airlines does a great job of incorporating edutainment into its pre-flight message. Delta has done the same in their pre-flight video.

Both take a serious subject and make it easy and memorable.

Edutainment also works for your content.

I found making dry content more interesting applies equally well to marketing. If we can pleasantly surprise the reader or make them smile, we have their attention.

Edutainment is simply entertaining education.

Over the years, I’ve done a lot of content revision. I take challenging, dull, or complicated subjects and make them more accessible and exciting to read. The result is more engagements.

It works for all types of content, from web pages to articles, blogs, and emails.

One thing to keep in mind

You need to stay true to your voice. You can lighten up and take a more friendly tone, but it needs to be in a way that is consistent with your brand.

The last thing you want to do is send mixed messages.

3 keys about edutainment content

The key to engaging customers is sharing your brand’s story. More than just the story, customers want to know the people behind the brand and its personality.

So if your content reads like a how-to assemble for home office storage cubes, that’s like skating on thin ice. Snoozeville. Many people will tackle the job and never attempt to follow boring directions.

Start with your story.

Revisit your story, your people, and the personality. Look for ways to create positive links. You want to link your brand and the positive experiences the person will have with it. How can it help them overcome a challenge and enjoy the benefits?

Break it into tiny snippets. Let each snippet share a tidbit of information showcased in a mini-story.

Mixed approach

You’ll need to appeal to both sides of the brain. You need to engage both the logical side of the brain as well as the emotional side. When done well, you don’t realize it’s happened.

The mini-story is subtle, not blatant in its approach. It doesn’t work if you’re too obvious.

It has to logically work at the same time that it’s entertaining our emotional side. Then it can subtly address our pain points and help us feel better, be happier, and enjoy life more.

Try video

Because of their visual nature, videos are instantly more entertaining. The content is generally less than three minutes, with the most popular well under one minute. Short gets more engagement.

The absolute best example of this is excellent inspiration.

So how would you take a dull topic like deodorant and turn it into edutainment on steroids?

A company did it. Which one? Old Spice. It saved the company from bankruptcy. The first series was titled “Smell like a man.”

The theme shared how your guy could at least smell like this great-looking actor, a football star—even if he couldn’t look like him. It was released in 2010 and has undergone various theme changes to keep up with an evolving market. But the pattern is still running today.

Their videos are among the top-watched on YouTube. The most-watched was one in the “Men have skin too” series with 59 MILLION views. Did I mention Old Spice now dominates the deodorant market?

It just goes to show anyone can benefit from a revamp. Out with dull or boring. In with edutainment.

So, how can Your brand’s story become more edutaining?


Your quality online content is critical to stay competitive. Ready to attract new buyers, increase lifetime buyer value, build sales, and more engagement? You need quality content. Let’s have a quick chat. You can message me: Judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

Buyer Behavior has changed for 2021

Buyer behavior changed in 2020 and there is no going back.

Everyone had to do a lot of shifting in 2020, and it changed our buyer behavior. It altered our expectations and values. 

That means it’s time for businesses, and marketers need to accommodate the changes to stay competitive.

We’ve changed how we buy

Our world has shifted, and we’ve had to change with it.  Even now, countries are again in lockdown across the globe, and the virus with its variants rages. The cycle continues. 

The pandemic has made us value health and safety like never before.

In areas where the cases are dropping and vaccinations completed, people are ready to go back inside more businesses. But they want to do it safely. 

If they see a business slacking on their cleaning protocols or not protecting their staff, they are highly likely to go elsewhere next time. They’ll probably tell others to avoid the place too.  

We’re not going back into businesses physically just because we can.  We’ve missed interacting with products as well as people outside our household. 

However, our expectations have changed.  If we don’t have a positive customer experience, we won’t return.  

Our expectations for convenience have increased. Curbside pickup, delivery, and virtual shopping assistance. You can get online help via AI chat, or a live style expert, or virtually try on cosmetics. 

No more wasted time in a doctor’s office when a virtual visit will do. We’ll do it online, thank you very much.  

Forbes Study on Buyer Behavior

In December of 2020, Forbes surveyed 1000 consumers.  They asked questions to determine how things had changed and if they were positive or negative.  The study looked at both online and offline experiences.  In January, they published their findings.

Every business needs to accommodate and embrace what buyers want, need, and expect in 2021 to stay competitive.  A big part of this will be rebuilding brand loyalty.  

Something to keep in mind

While the statistical findings are intriguing, one jumped at me. Brand loyalty took a massive shot in the foot last year.  People might not have been able to order their favorite brands, so they substituted.  Supply chain shortages have compounded this problem.  

Even more important than looking at the trend statistics is implementing proactive techniques to be the solution your target audience wants.  

Three techniques to capitalize on 2021 buyer behavior

There are three things buyers are wanting. Provide all of them, and you’ll go a long way to building brand loyalty. The loyalty that keeps customers returning and staying with you during whatever the next crisis might be.

Three keys to getting them and keeping them are health and safety, positive experiences, and convenience.

Health and safety

If there is one thing we learned from the pandemic, it’s that we each have to watch out for our health.  As we go back inside stores, shoppers are observing and critiquing health and safety standards.

While plastic dividers felt a bit awkward in the beginning, they are now the norm.  A business working without them would make most people uncomfortable—the same for staff not wearing masks.

Consumers want to see you are looking out for both them—and the employees that are taking care of them.  

People expect sanitation stations. Disinfecting counter services or any areas where the customer might touch between customers is crucial.

Buyers want positive experiences

From the moment they enter a business or visit an online store, they are subliminally noting the experience. They pay attention to the ambiance, friendliness, efficiency, and a way to get questions answered.

We’ve become a lot less patient with poor service however it manifests.

We’re also more socially conscious, and we want to see your staff well taken care of too.  

Online buyers have the same standards, and there is a lot of room for improvement. Evaluate everything from virtual aids to help buyers make a selection to improved customer service response. 

Key to online success will be fresh, relevant quality content. Everything: blog posts, articles, emails, social posts. The big boys like Pepsi and American Express and Apple are making massive investments in new content. Even Facebook is getting into content with the ability to post newsletters.

Both strictly e-commerce and brick and mortar capitalizing via the increase in online purchasing need to ramp up their content.

Solicit feedback from buyers. Implement short, easy-to-do “how did we do” surveys. 

A positive experience is without friction. Sometimes friction can be hard to see from the inside. Let your buyers help you smooth them out. 

Brick and mortar businesses need to move to touchless checkout. That could be self-checkout or contact-free payment processing.    

Shoppers notice things like clean pens, a sanitized payment device, and the check-out area wiped down between customers. 

Convenience is the new normal.

We’ve become accustomed to more customer service in the form of curbside pickup and virtual doctor appointments. These are things that probably should have been offered long ago. 

Those with physical challenges and or who don’t drive wish they had been.  

Inclusivity is now having things convenient for all.   

If convenience factors were a temporary add-on, look for ways to embrace them and improve them, so they become permanent. 

Look for new ways to enhance convenience, so you stand out from the competition. Buyers will reward you for it where it counts…in your cash register.


The leap has happened. Online purchasing has already blasted past 2021 forecasts. Your quality online content is critical to stay competitive. Ready to attract new buyers, increase lifetime buyer value, build sales, and more engagement? You need quality content. Let’s have a quick chat. You can message me: Judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

Personalization Versus Customer Experience

We used to want personalization. Now we need more. We need positive customer experiences.

Personalization is something companies like Amazon, Sephora, and Nike have trained us to expect.  It’s no longer enough to be customer-centric. We want experiences— a positive customer experience. That goes beyond personalization. 

In this time of massive upheaval and uncertainty, we’re looking for easy. Things that simplify our lives. People want easier, healthier, safer, more rewarding, and help us get things done. 

While we’re happy with our experiences in some areas, we continue to feel neglected and frustrated in others.

Follow the trend that’s working

We don’t need to reinvent or recreate the wheel in our marketing. Just look at what’s already earning companies like Amazon and Sophora millions.

These companies and many more are investing and involving more AI and analytic data to improve the customer experience. Amazon has been a leader in this. 

When you look for something, Amazon includes what other people who searched for the same item also considered. They show you what people who bought this item also purchased.  Subtle, helpful, and boosting the value of your order with add-ons. 

Sephora hasn’t become the worlds leading specialty beauty retailer by accident.  They started incorporating AI in the early 2000s.  Using various tech tools, they personalize everything from their choices for you to their 1:1 loyalty rewards.

The long-term goal for Sephora is to continue to enhance the virtual and in-store customer experiences. Not only will they help you shop virtually, but you can also try the makeup on virtually. 

Nike has innovated, so you can now design your own sneaker. They have a 3D platform that allows you to create a sneaker that fits perfectly and matches your unique style. Fans love the option.  

They also love the experience in the personalized NikePlus loyalty program. Fans get personalized benefits, product recommendations, and the ability to check and see if their favorite styles, colors, and sizes are available.    

The clock is ticking.

Customers used to make buying decisions based on loyalty or price. Those things are changing. More and more make those decisions based on the experience you offer them.  

In a recent survey by SuperOffice, they asked 1920 business professionals what their number one business priority is for the next five years.  By a distinct margin over product or product, customer experience came in at 45.9%.

Thought leaders say businesses who have unsatisfactory experiences are headed for trouble. They will start to see their client base erode if they don’t make the technical changes to improve it.

What you need to keep in mind

The level of stress doesn’t look to be dropping anytime soon.  Stressed shoppers are less friction tolerant.  If your buying experience is complicated, if your customer support is lackluster—you have challenges to solve.  

More than ever before, buyers don’t want transactions that are company sales-centric. It makes them feel like you’re just after their money.

Now I know you need their purchases to run your business, but the experience shouldn’t feel that way.  Feelings are pure emotion. You want to keep those feelings positive if you want to earn their trust, purchases, and loyalty.

Three ways to enhance customer experience

Companies with the most significant growth and success embrace the customer experience from the top down.  Everyone on the team needs to understand and have the power to improve it. For some businesses, it may be outside-the-box thinking. It may involve more work and initial expense. But if you look at the potential future revenues, it’s well worth the effort.

Think from the customer point of view

Start by thinking from the customer’s point of view.  Sometimes we are so close to the process that we can’t see the problems an outsider sees.  

Ask your customers, “what could we do better?”  “How could we make shopping easier?” In essence, how can you help them?  

If you have a customer service team, ask them.  The marketing and management teams need to know what customer service is hearing.  What the customers need and want that they aren’t getting.  

Customers’ questions and their problems provide the answers to improving your sales.   

Enhance customer service

Lousy customer service is a pet peeve of mine when I’m shopping online or in-person.  I understand company limitations but I also handle customer service for one of my clients. I get the challenges, but I know the value. I’ve gotten those evening and weekend calls where I’ve rescued a customer and solved their issue.

We recently went to Best Buy to find a laptop.  The store was busy. The staff was few and far between.  We found something suitable, but without the ability to get questions answered, they lost the sale.  

When we checked out, we mentioned the lack of staff to our checker. His reply, Best Buy just let another 500 people go. Team members are going to be in short supply for the foreseeable future.  In the end, Best Buy will lose its status as a provider of excellent customer care, and they will lose money.

Both brick and mortar and eCommerce businesses need to step up their customer service.  With all the options out there, companies need to find a way to expand the routes and time frame where people can get help.  

Look for ways to provide support beyond a few business hours.  Many times companies on the east and west coast ignore the three-hour time difference.  So if I’m on the west coast, I’d better not need anything after 2 PM local time.  

Expand your FAQ. Add an AI help option. Outsource or give someone a part-time job, so you are more accessible.  Make sure your website is easily searchable so I can find what I need. If your competition is more available, it will cost you money.

Analytics and AI

The most successful businesses are making use of technology to track shopping patterns and offer recommendations.  Per 2020 research by Gartner, we conduct about 85% of all purchases without assistance.  

That means there is a significant 15% opportunity to increase revenues by helping shoppers solve those issues.

Companies have many new ways to allow their customer support team to automate repetitive or straightforward tasks using artificial intelligence. Automation enables them to reduce costs and empower shoppers to solve their issues. Learn about your options and employ them. 

It is essential to do this in a transparent way to maintain trust and credibility.

Chatbots or voice-enabled chatbots are a top choice for businesses. Their effectiveness ties directly to the quality and comprehensiveness of the dialogue provided to the bot.

My final tip is to make sure your system works on all channels across all types of devices. More and more people are switching back and forth from phones to tablets to laptops and computers. Your system needs to deliver in all.


Looking to increase lifetime buyer value, build sales, and more engagement? Let’s have a quick chat. You can message me: Judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

Quality Content Grows Sales 300% Faster

Quality content drives sales when it extends across all your marketing.

The quickest way to increase sales is to focus on quality content. It’s a technique marketers know but many businesses don’t quite get right.  

People visit your website looking for something. They come in during different stages of their buying journey.   They may be trying to see if there is a solution for a problem they have.  For those in the second stage, they are trying to decide which solution is best. When they move to the third stage – they are making the decision to buy.

Help them find the information they need—easily

Since we’re all spending a lot more time at home, one of the most popular past-times has become home improvement projects.  

I was recently looking for landscaping plants to fill in some major changes we’d made.  I had a list of criteria. Easy to grow, tolerant of my sun exposure, and color.  I knew the size specifications and style theme I was looking for—an English garden type of feel.

Oregon can be a bit grey during the winter.  So I needed year-round color with different plant varieties. 

Once I narrowed my list down, I started looking to see who carried them. 

That step proved to be a bigger challenge than I expected.  All the locals seem to carry a narrow selection of the same popular varieties.  They carried current bloomers, but not what I’d need to complete the goal.

I finally found a website that shipped plants. I could tell by the home page tabs they carried a wide selection. The problem was you couldn’t search by a specific plant or plant type. There wasn’t a search engine, only dropdowns with general categories. 

“Shrubs” was as close as I could get to heather. I had to search through dozens of pages.  If my middle name wasn’t “Persistent”, I’d have just closed the tab. It certainly wasn’t user-friendly. I thought of calling them, but there was no one available. 

A huge complicated website, no search tools, limited customer support. Lots of content, but the quality suffered.

What marketing strategists know

As the one in my family who does most of the shopping, content really matters to me.  The websites that get me back, (unless I have no alternative,) make the experience easy.  

In my copywriter marketer work for clients, I keep that shopper’s desire in the back of my mind.

The information and content need to be useful and user-friendly.  

Here’s a secret about “content”

The word content has two meanings.  We think of content as the article or blog. But the other meaning is an emotion—happiness or satisfaction.

Ideally, the article will give the reader both. It will provide quality useful information and happiness with what you shared and how you presented it.

You’ll lose sales if they can’t find necessary information – they won’t be content. If they can’t easily access the information they want…they won’t like you and if they don’t like you – forget the purchase.

3 tips for value content

To maximize your marketing investment, you need quality useful content that focuses on your customer’s needs.  You need the right content in the places they will find it. And you need to make sure it’s not undermining you.

Focus on your customer

All sales go back to the customer.  Everything you put on your website, every message you put out there should focus on your ideal customer—the person who wants and needs your product.

Start with questions they might have. Answer them with the right content.  Think about what they need to know, what validation they need, and how it’s going to benefit them. 

People need to see benefits first to trigger the thought to buy. Then they subliminally need that thought validated with support information.  

What content do you need?

Content is made up of various parts. Keep in mind you’re trying to give them more than a product—you’re trying to trigger happiness and satisfaction.  

That means they want information about your business. In a recent survey, the number one thing consumers said they want is your contact information! A whopping 62% put it at the top of their list.

The second most important item was the “About You” page.  Rounding out the top three were social media icons so they could check out what others were saying about you.  They are looking for transparency and why you should be their choice.

You can’t neglect product information, educational articles, and success stories. All are important to help them along the buyers’ path.  

A blog is one of your best avenues to share high-quality information that’s tied to the products or services you offer. The blog can help you expand your audience, increase conversions and enhance brand awareness.

Consumers are becoming leery of promises that sound too good.  If you sell them hype, you’ll only get a one-time sale.

Where does content need to be?

You need content beyond your website to build the know, like, and trust factors that trigger sales.  You need to put it in places your ideal customers hang out. That goes back to really knowing your customer.  

Depending on their demographics it might be Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.  If you’re making use of video content, you’ll include a YouTube channel. You can also offer shopping right on your Facebook and Instagram pages.  

Share posts with graphics and snippets of a blog or article located on your website. Include a link to drive traffic so they can read the full article.

Get rid of placeholder words

If you’ve run out of time and your website still has WordPress filler words like Lorem ipsum, it’s time to get help. Many people don’t realize these placeholders in Latin are visible to the public. They destroy your credibility.

If you don’t have the time or the skills, you need a good copywriter who can share messages to increase your sales and make your readers “content.” Need to improve your ROI with quality content? https://www.jculpcreativecopy.com/

Subheads are Powerful Marketing Tools

Subheads are powerful marketing tools that can make or break your great content.

Headlines share the heart or big idea of your message. Subheads are miniature headlines placed throughout the copy.  They make your message more readable and share key points.

Have you ever received an email or visited a web page where the copy was one long block? Or did it rambled on in uninterrupted paragraphs?  

They are rather hard to read. I find myself wondering where the writer is going.

What are they trying to tell me?  When will I get to why this is important for me?

And what are they trying to sell me or get me to do?

Even if the message is from someone I enjoy hearing from, it requires commitment on my part to wade through what they are sharing.  

Often, if the reader is vested in the person sharing the message, they are still busy.  They’ll set the message aside to read later.  Only, later may never come. If an email, it may sit getting lost in a cluttered inbox. Worse, it may get filed for future reading or reference.

That’s not what any business wants for their messages. 

What’s in subheads for you?

In my work as a copy and content writer, I see this problem all too often. It’s certainly something I avoid happening with my clients.  

Now, If I could just get those who are messaging me to see how using subtitles can solve the problem—and keep me engaged.

I’ve found it’s hard to stay engaged with a business whose messages aren’t clear and easily digested. Here are some tips you can employ to use subtitles effectively and to your advantage.

Here’s one thing to keep in mind.

There’s an easy pattern for knowing where to place subheads.  If your message is more than 300 words long, you need subheads.  

No section of your message should be longer than 300 words before the next subhead.

When you follow this pattern, you have maximum readability. 

Three tips for compelling subheads.

Every message you share, content, articles, blogs, emails, focuses like a laser on one idea. 

Within that copy, each subhead has a focus. And within the subhead, each paragraph covers one thought and each sentence only one topic. 

Think of creating an outline for your copy.  Your Roman number I shares the promise or core idea in the title or headline. Each of the support pillars is a subset for that idea. 

Those subsets become subheadings in your document.

Subheads keep your readers reading when using the same guidelines you follow for creating titles, headlines, or subject lines. 

Lead your reader forward

In long-form sales letters, each section engages the reader. Regardless of the type of message you’re writing, you want it to do the same thing. You want each part to make them want more.  

Subheads in your message or copy help you do this. 

Doing a brain dump on the first draft is OK to get started. Then the message needs refinement. 

Each paragraph and each section should engage and keep the reader’s attention.

If you are taking a blog, article, or other copy and thin-slicing it into social media posts, each post focuses at most on one subheading. Indeed, each subhead becomes a social post.  

They should stand on their own as a mini-headline to catch attention and engage.

Enticing

Some people only read the subheads. If they don’t exist or aren’t enticing, you’ll lose them. They need to catch and keep the reader’s attention. 

Other people only start reading when a subhead catches their attention. No subheads, and you lose this opportunity for engagement. 

Both groups depend on your subhead to entice them to read.

Subheads create a snapshot of your message.

In today’s world, especially in the US, people tend to scan far more than they read. That makes subheads critical for readers who just scan, to understand your message.

If the reader only reads your subheads, they should “get” your message.

One technique I use is to print out my draft and read through it, looking for snippets. They should be almost like inspirations or quotes. They are a few words that impart an essential aspect of my big idea.  

Each snippet is a subhead. 

Repurposed snippets become a social post—useful concepts in just a few words. 

Including emotion, pain points, or trigger words makes them even more effective.


Judith Culp Pearson is a copywriter marketer who has been helping clients improve their ROI and client retention since 2015. A relationship-building writer, she engages your readers to increase sales and lifetime value. https://www.jucithculpcreativecopy.com