Marketing for Beauty and Wellness?

Beauty is more tied into cultural standards for ideal mates while wellness is about healthy lifestyle choices including exercise, nutrition and spirituality.
Beauty and Wellness Attributes

Beauty and Wellness comprise over a 4.2 trillion dollar market and growing exponentially.  But the terms can be a bit confusing or vague. So, as a marketer, how do you pick the best words to reach your market? A recent study by the University of Pennsylvania showed that while there are some commonly associated definitions, there is also a broad diversity. 

That study focused on semantics and looked at term associations based on age groups and gender. My concerns were as a marketer. How do we choose the correct terms to reach our target market? Do people understand what wellness encompasses?  What about beauty?  How do people actually think about it, define, it and engage with it? 

What do those in Wellness say?

This spring, I interviewed over a dozen different people in the wellness industry.  Marketers, beauty and supplement manufacturers, coaches, fitness experts, nutritionists, and more. As much diversity of the sector as I could connect with.  

My core question was how we could make wellness more understandable in our messages. Do people really “get” how diverse it is? The responses were all over the place.  Some had found phrases or words that connected with their specific segment of the public. 

Others were all about expanding the dialogue about how to better share wellness concepts. They agreed there is an opportunity for a lot of improvement.

Effectively marketing beauty and wellness depends on the audience.

As with all marketing success, communication is the key. First, you have to hone in on your target audience.  The more you know about your ideal client, the easier it is to select the best terms to connect, engage and move them forward. This identification is essential considering the diversity found in this study.

In this study, they found that some terms are cross-generational.  Others terms are age-related. The more life experience, the more it colors the way we think.  And yes, it makes a difference whether you are selling to men or women.

When working with clients, experienced marketers focus on these differences. The more we understand how our target group thinks about beauty and wellness, the more we engage them.

Here’s a secret they discovered

We can’t discount the survival genetics built into our primal brain.  Ancient ancestors’ survival depended on selecting a suitable mate.  Attributes of attraction were those that indicated the ability to survive and procreate. Those would have been considered beauty.

For both sexes, this meant appealing, attractive features, good teeth, and a strong constitution. 

The most desirable men had a body built for successful hunting and protection. The most beautiful women had a body configured for pregnancy and to nurture children. Attributes related to healthy and fertile mates.

Those with less desirable features or lacking other attributes slipped down the selection pyramid from the top choice. These preferences are still clearly evident among animal groups today. A puny, weak animal isn’t going to have the opportunity to procreate. It was about the survival of the species.

Look at any magazine or marketing advertisement today, and you can still see these biases in action among humans. It’s only been very recently we are embracing and recognizing the value in those who are unique or different.

Three considerations for key term selection

The study findings divide into three categories. First, there were terms common to all age groups and both men and women respondents.  Second, generational dependent words. And third choices that were different between genders.

Generally accepted terms for beauty and wellness.

The survival considerations that guided our ancient ancestors evolved over the millennia. Greek and Roman influence involved more intellectual pursuits and lifestyle, as well as that of seeking pleasure. 

Beauty today is most often associated with lovely, feminine, gorgeous, elegant, stylish, and sexy. Elegance and grace are different from sexiness, but there is a clear overlap in the association with beauty.

Key wellness alternatives include fitness, aerobics, health, lifestyle, nutrition, thrive, holistic, and meditation. 

They also verified what the marketers I interviewed noticed. 

  1. Generally, there is more clarity and uniformity on the term beauty. 
  2. At the same time, there is more diversity in the meaning of wellness.  

The term beauty is more related to physical and cultural attributes. On the other hand, wellness relates more to active practices that promote health and thriving.

Generational differences on beauty and wellness.

The study included people from Gen-Z, Millennials, Gen-X, and Baby Boomers. It acknowledged there are individual differences within each group despite the commonalities. 

Life experiences influenced the term associations.  The study proposes that with the accumulation of life experience, we increase the tendency to segregate semantically. As a result, the terms become more specific. 

Our increased lifespan, and therefore increased level of experience may also contribute to differences.

Another attribution for the difference is age heightens socio-cultural awareness and related stereotypes.  Most often, these are related to the words attributed to young, beautiful, healthy bodies.

In the past, men identified with looking rugged, macho, and exhibiting athletic superiority. However, younger men today are increasingly concerned with personal image and appearance. These shifts may result from the changing employment culture’s impact on social values.

Variations by gender

It’s interesting to note that semantics, the meaning of the words used, were more structured among women than men.  

When considering the terms beauty and wellness, women segregated them more. For example, education had been classified initially as a wellness term. But among both women and boomers, it was attributed to beauty.

Another example is that delicious, exotic, and talent were initially classified as beauty terms.  But in some groups, they are more associated with wellness. So again, it’s about researching and knowing your specific group.

When I work with clients

I help them match their message, the terms used, and the SEO to their targeted audience. It’s complex and requires segmenting the audience, tracking, and testing to assure the best outcome. https://www.jculpcreativecopy.com.
For the complete details and the full article, you can read it here.

Customer Experience Enhancers Increase $$$

The customer experience dictates the customer rating. Enhance it and watch profits rise.

Customer experience enhancers create more loyalty, repeat sales, and profitability. The pandemic disrupted the traditional shopping model forcing people to go online. It stuck.

People often now use a blend between the two. The lines between online and a physical store are becoming blurred. More than ever, it’s about what this blend feels like before buying, while making a purchase, and afterward.

A true story of enhancing the customer experience

One of the companies I work with shared how changing a tiny detail made a huge difference. They have an e-commerce store selling both consumer products and professional-only products. But about 95% of their business is professional sales.

To enhance the buying experience for professionals, they set up a drop-down system to validate they were eligible to buy the professional products. The drop-down streamlined the shopping process as they didn’t have to take the time to set up an account.  

The shipping manager received an email from a regular customer: 

Why is there a note that pops up that says I’m not ordering XXXXX? That’s the only product I ever order?

The manager quickly responded, explained why they had the drop-down process. She also thanked the customer for bringing it to her attention. Then, she told the client she was going to see if they could change the default.  

This one tiny change, altering a default, reduced the number of questions the shipping manager got and made her life much easier.  It also made 95% of the customer’s lives easier because they now don’t have to change the default.  

The company still does random checking to validate that the customers are qualified professionals. But it was an easy fix and win-win change.

Customer Experience Enhancers work.

Enhancing the customer experience is the top proven technique to reduce churn, retain customers and increase profits.  The longer you can keep a customer loyal, the lower your acquisition cost. It also raises the Lifetime Customer Value exponentially.

It’s five to seven times more expensive to find a new customer than to keep them. And you’ll increase sales. 

The odds of a new prospect purchasing are between 5 and 20%. But with an existing customer, the odds of another sale jump to 60-70%.  Retention is smart for business. 

I’ve seen this over and over in my businesses and working with clients. Every little detail that makes the customer’s experience better is a significant positive.

Little things are big experience enhancers.

Some changes may be significant, and others, like in the example, are small technical things. However, they all make a difference in the customer’s experience and overall happiness rating. 

For maximum success, the entire brand team needs to communicate, share, and look for ways to be better. The team that interacts directly with shoppers often has overlooked information. Keep them in the loop. Listen to them. Empower them to facilitate and stimulate changes that make shopper’s lives easier.

The Three E’s of customer experience enhancers 

More than ever before, customers turn to the internet for information. And they are using a blended model of shopping in person and online. If in your store and thinking of a purchase, they may compare prices online. Or check customer reviews.

The experience you offer needs to be seamless and supportive throughout their buying journey.

As they experience your content, your customer support, and your social media connectivity, they form an emotional reaction to doing business with you. Positive, negative, or neutral. 

Those businesses that focus on enhancing positive experiences will see the greatest success.

Experience enhance content 

Often businesses in the past had more of an online brochure rather than a customer-focused shopping experience. That model doesn’t work today. Your website needs to feature lots of fresh, helpful content and an easy way to find it.  They want positive experience content.

The underlying theme of content is how this product or service will make their life easier, better, more fulfilling, and fun. Emotional connectedness. Then the supporting information validates why this is so. They want the proof: reviews, testimonials, scientific studies, what experts say, and more. 

They want all of this in an easy-to-access format that makes shopping a pleasure.

Today’s consumer doesn’t want to have to call to get help or find what they need. They want more of a self-service experience. They don’t want to wait days or weeks to get an email response. The longer they have to wait to get answers, the more likely they’ll go elsewhere.

It’s like when you need a service or repair person, and no one calls you back. You go from enthusiastic to neutral to frustrated.

Help shoppers get to know you.

Shoppers want easy access to learning about you and your products—and what makes you unique. They want

  • Answers to all the frequently asked questions. 
  • To read your blogs about how you developed a product or service.
  • To understand how you are helping the planet and being socially responsible 
  • Easy access to resource pages, blogs, articles and to learn about your products and services.
  • To know you and your team as individuals rather than just a company.

Consider offering books, e-books, reports, guides, video how-tos, and other valuable resources.

Customer service is always an experience. All too often, it is a frustrating, time-consuming process. It needs to be friendly, knowledgeable, supportive. Phone connections are great, but if they are searching on their phone and can do a live chat, that works. 

Experience enhance service

For many consumers, a common complaint is the lack of staffing. Lack of staffing might have been a valid excuse during the early days of the pandemic, but it doesn’t fly anymore. 

AI is getting more intelligent, and the interactions with it are more favorable. It just needs to be helpful and able to quickly move the shopper to live chat or a phone connection if the AI can’t solve the problem.  

Communicate with customers where they hang out. Often this is social media. Use social as a way to stimulate interaction with customers and potential customers. Invite them to ask questions and respond promptly. 

Look for ways to reward customers. It doesn’t always need to be a discount. For example, a free guide on having the best experience with your product would be of high value to a new client. 

Develop a customer reward program that makes them feel positive about being loyal to your brand. People love to be part of a group, especially an exclusive group. So invite them to be part of your brand. Treat them like an online family.

Online-Offline-Online

Then take the online experience offline. Send new customers or those who have referred new clients a physical thank-you note. Send a reward to be used on a future purchase. When everything now comes to inboxes, something in the mail we view as unique, special. 

Blend the experience to connect with them online, offline, and back online seamlessly.

Be sure to give them ample time to use any rewards. 

Avoid rewards with a short use timeframe. For example, if you just purchased a printer that touts it has a year’s worth of ink in it, why would you respond to an offer to buy more ink now?  

Amazon gives credits when you buy a kindle book, but they are very short-lived. If you don’t use them in a week, they’re gone. That’s not very buyer-friendly.

Experience Enhance Connections

These are all the points where consumers interact with your brand.  Website, social media, email, print ads, radio, or even television. Using the formats that make sense for your business, look for ways to enhance the experience.

Website experience

If you offer AI or live chats, evaluate how well that is working. What does your customer service team hear from customers?  

Integrate with the service team to identify and smooth out rough spots in the buying process.

Is your team/system available enough to be helpful?  We have a three-hour time difference across the continental US. Consider where your customers are calling from?  Can they easily reach you? 

Stand in your customer’s place. How would you feel about the service if you were in their location? Think outside the box to find a way to smooth and improve this experience. Consider more online self-support information, so they aren’t dependent on phone calls.

Social posting connections

Social posts need to be fun, friendly, and seeking to engage. Get them to smile, inspire them, show them success.

The most successful posting is frequent and regular. People pay attention to what they see repeatedly.  That’s why paid ads pop up after you’ve looked at something. Whatever caught your eye and you looked at is now popping up everywhere you go on the internet. It’s reminding you to look again.

Email personalized experience

With so much in our inboxes, generic transactional emails quickly get filed or deleted. Instead, emails personalized by interest get more attention. Tone and engagement are essential. 

When doing a marketing assessment, I look at it from the shopper’s viewpoint. I look for things to smooth, enhance and increase engagement.  In today’s world, it’s all about experience enhancers to grow business. www.jculpcreativecopy.com

Your Exclusive Rewards Build Customer Loyalty and Dollars Spent

Last week I talked about the importance of enhancing your business rewards program.  I wasn’t the only person talking about the need for this. Customer Experience Futurist Blake Morgan was also sharing.  

This year it is more important than ever before to offer rewards tailored to your targeted audience. If your audience includes Gen Z, the positive stats for loyalty rewards jump even higher.

Review of Ms. Morgan’s article

50 Stats that Show the Importance of Good Loyalty Rewards

If you don’t yet have a loyalty program, it’s time to join the more than 90% of companies that do.

52% of American consumers will join the loyalty program of brands they regularly purchase. A surprising 84% have made a redemption from a rewards program.

Not all loyalty programs get used. Most, 65% of consumers engage with less than half of their loyalty programs. 

Satisfaction with loyalty programs has dropped to 44%, down from 47% in 2018.  People are looking for businesses that offer something better.

Interestingly a whopping 95% of consumers, according to Code Broker, want to engage with more loyalty programs using chatbots, AI, or VR and their smart devices.  75% want them accessible on their smartphone.

Engage with your customers emotionally, and they spend 27% more.  Personalization is huge. When you do it well for your members, it creates a 6.4x lift in their satisfaction with your program.

Loyalty rewards increase sales

One stat I didn’t mention, Incentive Solutions, shared that adding a loyalty program to your e-commerce platform can increase average order quantity by 319%.  

With the competition becoming more fierce as companies try to capture some of the “rebound spending,” it’s vital to ramp up bonding. The better your rewards, the stronger your fan loyalty will be. 

Make sure those rewards are easy to earn and relevant to your audience.

Psychographics can maximize your rewards program.

Psychographics focuses on what and why people respond as they do. And the buying triggers are different for women and men. Since women influence so much of the spending, cater to their reward psychographics to maximize your efforts.

The use of psychographics can be of benefit when considering personalization and relevance. But it’s also beneficial for the emotional triggers of social consciousness. 

Here are my 3 key takeaways on the benefits of loyalty rewards.

There are certainly lots of things to consider to create a winning rewards program.`

Keep reward programs simple

The last thing your customers want is a complicated reward system. In the article, stats showed that you’d reduce the number of users if you require a downloaded app. 

The days of wallets stuffed with rewards cards are over.  Most people don’t want to carry them, and yours is apt to be left on the counter or tossed. 

Avoid or give very generous expiration dates. Rewards expiring before use is a frustration for members. Be sure to thank them for a redemption—you’ll be in the minority that does.

Most consumers, 95%, want to access their rewards via their smartphones. They like to use AI, Chatbots, and VI.  

Giving gifts increases bonding.

Finding ways to say thank you, even when they make a redemption, holds value for consumers.  And if you employ those thank yous, you’ll be in the minority of businesses who take that extra step.

I’ve never met anyone who didn’t enjoy a surprise gift or an unexpected piece of mail that wasn’t trying to sell something…just say thank you. 

If you don’t have physical products, there are other options. There are numerous programs available that offer gifts that can be personalized. It becomes a branding opportunity to keep customers thinking of you.  Branded items offer a bit of swag, another bonus members love.

Even early access to sales is a gift they like.  46% of customers love this bonus.

Or, send members an incentive.75% of consumers purchased something after receiving a reward.

Willing to pay for upgraded loyalty reward program

Don’t discount an upgrade option. Creating an optional paid upgrade can bond members even more. They paid something, which increases the desire to use the benefits. 

Paid membership puts you into an elite inner circle. After a year of being disconnected, being a part of something has enhanced value.  

When I work with clients

For new clients, or when we’re doing a review, I put on my “consumer hat.”  I put myself in the shoes of their target audience and look for ways to enhance their customer experience and loyalty programs. 

A customer who likes your brand and is pleased with your rewards program is far more apt to recommend you to their friends.

Need help?  Judith@jculpcreativecopy.com.

You can read Blake Morgan’s Article HERE.

Is this #1 thing hurting your email marketing?

Does your suffer from this email marketing fatal flaw? A lack of content to help the reader.

Value Content truly is king. Successful engagement and customer retention take more than sales. Your readers want interesting, relevant information—Value Content.  You need it on your website, social media and in your emails.

Which emails do you prefer to receive value content or sales?

As a consumer and as a marketer, I frequently sign up to learn more about a company and/or their products. I want to know what they offer, what value they share, and the marketing techniques they use.

At least 85% of them send me emails that are sales notices. Sometimes, multiple times a week every week. 

That 85% is missing an important success determiner.  

Where is the recipient in their buying decision?

The people who respond to a sale notice already know the company and want the product. They are just waiting for a great price to buy it.

The rest of the audience may not have enough information yet to make a buying decision. The notice of a sale is probably not going to give them what they need. 

That group will probably feel a little frustrated.  They couldn’t get enough information or find what they wanted on your website or social media.  That means lost sales.

They may hang around hopeful you will send something useful. Or they may just unsubscribe and look elsewhere. Even worse, they could tag you as spam, which can have its own repercussions.

Business owners and marketers need value content

As the business owner or marketer for your brand, you need to understand when to send sales copy and when to send informational content.

I’ve found in my work with clients, it is something often overlooked. The good news? The 15% of businesses that focus on the buyer’s journey have a wide-open field. This group focuses on providing useful information and guiding the prospect through the purchase and beyond. They engage them and build a relationship.

This business practice sets them apart from competitors by focusing on the customer’s need, rather than the sale.

When I added a monthly newsletter for one of my clients, it made a huge difference. The newsletter followed the best practices of at least 80% useful information. In the bottom section, they announced the monthly specials. In less than 10 months, the gross sales for this 20-year-old company increased by 22%.

Relevant value information for the target audience increased both sales and retention. Higher lifetime customer value.

Keep in mind…

It all goes back to your list.  If your product offerings and/or your audience interests are diverse, you need to segment. 

In some situations, different demographics may use the same product. But they may use it in different ways.  That means your content writer has to address both uses in one email, or those groups need separating.

The emails that go out need to be focused on what is important to the audience segment that receives them.  

3 types of value content to share

There are different types of value that you can share. Today’s consumer is looking for MORE information than ever before. They are looking for some things that weren’t a consideration two years ago.

Some information is great to share with your entire audience. Other things need to be segmented.  

Share content on what’s new and upcoming

If you’re adding a new product or new division, your audience wants to know this.  Again, this information may be full list appropriate or segmented.  

If you have added a new social or environmental responsibility, your audience, your online family, will want to know. In today’s world, these are considered highly important steps.  But follow up those announcements with documentation of actual implementation. 

They want to see your words in action.

They also want to know you are taking care of your team.

Take them behind the curtain with staff, product and values content.

For many years, the brand was a product, a company. Now your audience wants to buy from a human being.  Human to human. 

This is crucial for online connections as you aren’t physically face to face.

They want to meet you and learn about your products, your values and your mission. They want to see these aren’t empty marketing words. Today’s buyer wants to connect with you and become part of your group, your tribe. We’ve been so disconnected, “being a part” of something is highly valued.

They love meeting your team, the people that create what they are buying or help take care of their needs. 

Showcase new hires, promotions, or your employee of the month—and why.

Show the value this person brings and how they might interact with them. 

This kind of showcasing has another function…staff loyalty and retention. We all crave to be recognized and appreciated. Show your business cares.

Useful product content

I use a Fitbit and MyFitness Pal. I get daily emails with helpful information. How to get the best results, how to maximize the interaction, and tips for success.

You want to do this with your products or services.  Nurture them with useful, helpful content.  Tips, techniques, and or success stories. 

If it is a complex product, help them understand how it, or its ingredients, work to give them the desired result.

Share unique or new techniques customers discovered and shared via feedback or social. 

Be sure to emphasize social channels you or your team are regularly active on. Let them know where to find you, how you answer questions and the best ways to reach you.


Judith Culp Pearson is a copywriter and content marketer for brands in the wellness sector. Products that help improve people’s lives.  Need help to maximize your email marketing? Reach out to her via her website, Linked In, or by clicking her name link.

Subheads are Powerful Marketing Tools

Subheads are powerful marketing tools that can make or break your great content.

Headlines share the heart or big idea of your message. Subheads are miniature headlines placed throughout the copy.  They make your message more readable and share key points.

Have you ever received an email or visited a web page where the copy was one long block? Or did it rambled on in uninterrupted paragraphs?  

They are rather hard to read. I find myself wondering where the writer is going.

What are they trying to tell me?  When will I get to why this is important for me?

And what are they trying to sell me or get me to do?

Even if the message is from someone I enjoy hearing from, it requires commitment on my part to wade through what they are sharing.  

Often, if the reader is vested in the person sharing the message, they are still busy.  They’ll set the message aside to read later.  Only, later may never come. If an email, it may sit getting lost in a cluttered inbox. Worse, it may get filed for future reading or reference.

That’s not what any business wants for their messages. 

What’s in subheads for you?

In my work as a copy and content writer, I see this problem all too often. It’s certainly something I avoid happening with my clients.  

Now, If I could just get those who are messaging me to see how using subtitles can solve the problem—and keep me engaged.

I’ve found it’s hard to stay engaged with a business whose messages aren’t clear and easily digested. Here are some tips you can employ to use subtitles effectively and to your advantage.

Here’s one thing to keep in mind.

There’s an easy pattern for knowing where to place subheads.  If your message is more than 300 words long, you need subheads.  

No section of your message should be longer than 300 words before the next subhead.

When you follow this pattern, you have maximum readability. 

Three tips for compelling subheads.

Every message you share, content, articles, blogs, emails, focuses like a laser on one idea. 

Within that copy, each subhead has a focus. And within the subhead, each paragraph covers one thought and each sentence only one topic. 

Think of creating an outline for your copy.  Your Roman number I shares the promise or core idea in the title or headline. Each of the support pillars is a subset for that idea. 

Those subsets become subheadings in your document.

Subheads keep your readers reading when using the same guidelines you follow for creating titles, headlines, or subject lines. 

Lead your reader forward

In long-form sales letters, each section engages the reader. Regardless of the type of message you’re writing, you want it to do the same thing. You want each part to make them want more.  

Subheads in your message or copy help you do this. 

Doing a brain dump on the first draft is OK to get started. Then the message needs refinement. 

Each paragraph and each section should engage and keep the reader’s attention.

If you are taking a blog, article, or other copy and thin-slicing it into social media posts, each post focuses at most on one subheading. Indeed, each subhead becomes a social post.  

They should stand on their own as a mini-headline to catch attention and engage.

Enticing

Some people only read the subheads. If they don’t exist or aren’t enticing, you’ll lose them. They need to catch and keep the reader’s attention. 

Other people only start reading when a subhead catches their attention. No subheads, and you lose this opportunity for engagement. 

Both groups depend on your subhead to entice them to read.

Subheads create a snapshot of your message.

In today’s world, especially in the US, people tend to scan far more than they read. That makes subheads critical for readers who just scan, to understand your message.

If the reader only reads your subheads, they should “get” your message.

One technique I use is to print out my draft and read through it, looking for snippets. They should be almost like inspirations or quotes. They are a few words that impart an essential aspect of my big idea.  

Each snippet is a subhead. 

Repurposed snippets become a social post—useful concepts in just a few words. 

Including emotion, pain points, or trigger words makes them even more effective.


Judith Culp Pearson is a copywriter marketer who has been helping clients improve their ROI and client retention since 2015. A relationship-building writer, she engages your readers to increase sales and lifetime value. https://www.jucithculpcreativecopy.com

How to Improve Testimonials

It's not just getting testimonials, it's about getting quality testimonials that trigger more sales.

With the explosive increase in the number of people shopping, the online marketplace has become more crowded.  For business, that means the value and the power of great testimonials is a potent tool for sales.

However, sometimes finding the right testimonial is like looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack.

Has this happened to you?

I was working on a project recently and needed to add some testimonials for the landing page.  I went to the client’s website to see what people had to say.

“Good product.”

“Easy shopping.”

“Quick delivery.” 

“Just arrived.”

“Love the product.”

Those weren’t exactly what I was looking for.  While the testimonials were positive, they didn’t say much about the user experience with the product.  

If you’re shopping for a product or service that takes time to get the desired result, you’re looking for more information. You want to know what kind of results were achieved, what it was like to use, and how long it actually took to get there.

You’d also like to know what the company is like to interact with should you have questions or need customer service.

Why use testimonials? 

We know testimonials play an essential role in helping shoppers make a decision.  But just how important are they?

Here’s what the market analyzers say:

  • 92% of people read reviews before buying
  • 72% say positive testimonials increase their trust and make buying more likely.
  • Most people, 73%, read six or less. They like to see lots of testimonials but often read just a few before making their decision.

The quality of testimonials can outweigh how many you have. If you have five good positive testimonials, it can increase your conversions by 270%.

Here’s one thing to keep in mind.

You need to ask for testimonials.  Most people don’t write a testimonial or review without prompting.  

The best time to ask is shortly after they’ve received their purchase. Give the purchaser time to try the product/service before you ask. For products that take a while to get results, touch base with them again to see how it’s going.

If you’re offering supplements or, say, weight loss techniques, a review after three days of use isn’t going to tell you much. Use the shortly after receipt message as an opportunity to answer questions on use.

A second follow-up in a month or later might make more sense to see how it is performing.

Three tips to maximize testimonials

Here are some simple ways to maximize your testimonials and their use. 

Enhance how you ask. 

I find including simple questions in the review process can improve the kind of testimonials received. Questions that help you get beyond the yay or nay to the why.  

Amazon has this type of helpful process established right on the review screen. At the top of the screen, it identifies the specific product. They ask for an overall star-based rating and three feature ratings. Then a place for your headline and review. Simple.

Make it easy to respond. There are various apps out there to help you gather testimonials. Select one that allows you to guide the purchaser in writing the review.

Send the request via email and a link to where/how you’d like it submitted. 

Open the email by thanking them again for the item they purchased, mentioning it by name.  Then, tell them you’d love their feedback and share the link.

In your review template, include helpful questions.  

  1. What’s your favorite thing about the product you purchased?
  2. How do you use the product?
  3. Did you have any hesitations before you purchased?  Did the product resolve them?
  4. Is there anything else you’d like to share?

Be sure to get their permission to share the testimonial in your marketing to help other shoppers.  A simple tick box can handle this.

Edit them 

It is perfectly acceptable to edit testimonials as long as you don’t alter the meaning or intent.

Always only use real testimonials by verified buyers. Fake testimonials can destroy a company quickly and are easily spotted. 

You don’t have to use the quote verbatim. Help it read more clearly by breaking run-on sentences into shorter ones. Remove spelling errors. Look for ways to clarify the wording.

If possible, include an emotional trigger word to help a reader make a decision.

Just don’t change what the message is saying.  

Select targeted testimonials

Choose the right testimonials for how you want to use it. A collection of raving testimonials about socks won’t help you sell shirts.

Use the right message and emotionally connect with the product/service.

Some testimonials are more general and not specific to a product. If the customer had a positive experience with you and your team, they can be gold.  They work well on your homepage as trust-builders. 

A testimonial extolling your fabulous customer service and their help in finding the right product could go multiple places.  

If you offer a variety of products, put the testimonials where they will do the most good. You can have a general customer testimonial page. 

If you put sock testimonials on the sock page, it increases conversions for sock purchases.

When I work with clients…

We focus on gathering useful testimonials.  I encourage them to allow reviews via the product purchase page.  

Many e-commerce platforms notify you of a new review and let you view it before publishing it. Amazon does this. The seller can respond to a negative review and problem-solve. It also allows screening for spam.  www.jculpcreativecopy.com.